Margie Livingston | Oil Paintings


click on any image to enlarge:


STRUCTURE (autumn blue), 2005
Oil on canvas on panel
22 x 30 inches
$5,000



BLUE LIGHT IN THE DARK, 2009
Oil on paper
30 x 22 inches
$2,500



YELLOW, BLUE, AND GREEN, SMALL, 2007
Oil on linen
7 x 5 inches
$1,200



BLUE AND YELLOW, SMALL, 2007
Oil on linen
7 x 5 inches
$1,200

Margie Livingston | Earlier Large Paintings


UNTITLED (thin over thick), 2000
Oil on canvas, 96 x 72 inches
$7,000. unframed




UNTITLED (skeleton), 2000

Oil on canvas, 96 x 72 inches
$7,000. unframed




UNTITLED (yellow loop), 1999-2001

Oil on canvas, 96 x 72 inches
$7,000. unframed




Drawings


STUDY FOR SHENZHEN #3, 2007
Charcoal on paper, 10.75 x 12.5 inches
$500



STUDY FOR SHENZHEN #11 , 2007
Charcoal on paper, 10.5 x 15.5 inches
$700


Prints


STRUCTURE (spit-bite grid), 2007
Aquatint and spit-bite, 22 x 30 inches
Edition of 20

$700. unframed
$950. framed



STRUCTURE (hardground grid), 2007
Aquatint and spit-bite, 22 x 30 inches
Edition of 20

$700. unframed
$950. framed

Livingston's paintings are based on the structure of trees and branches and the effects of light due to changes in weather. Livingston brings fragments of the landscape (branches, twigs, and leaves) into her studio, placing them in perspective study grids made of string hanging from her ceiling. This somewhat classical method of rendering objects belies Livingston's finished paintings. Stylistically, her handling of the medium is informed and confident, reducing each observation to a series of non-objective, non-gestural marks. Irregular natural forms are rendered simply as color, line and geometry--her original inspirations distilled to their essences. It is in this distillation where her subject matter gives way to pure painting. Her grasp of the ramifications of each gesture and nuance of articulation is one of her most mature qualities and a keynote of her poetic style. Conceptually, Livingston is dealing with issues of mortality, environmental preservation and sense of loss with regard to the landscape, lending complicated poignancy to her work.

Livingston received her MFA from the University of Washington in 1999. In 2001 a Fulbright Scholarship allowed her to study in Germany, tracing her heritage and reaffirming her artistic roots in the German Romantic painters of the 19th Century. She has been exhibiting her work regularly in the Northwest since 1994. A painting from her 2004 exhibition with the Gallery was acquired by the Tacoma Art Museum for their permanent collection.